Building a Curved Deck

Figure 1. Still sound, the old joists needed only to have their tops planed flat in order to be reused.

Figure 2. With an excavator on site for other work, setting the footings in a trench allowed accurate layout and minimal shovel work.

Figure 3. Careful planning meant that some footings could share loads from both the deck and the pergola.

Figure 4. Computer-drawn plans provided precise footing locations, speeding layout in the field.

Figure 5. A hand sketch helped the author plan decking quantities with minimal waste.

Figure 6. The fruit of the computer-drawn plans was correctly located footings for both the deck and the curved pergola.

Figure 7. Where the joists would run nearly tangent to the edge of the deck, their supporting beam had to run as close to the deck’s outer edge as possible.

Figure 8. The upper deck meets the lower deck in a sinuous compound curve, which is supported by a complex blocking system (next).

The upper deck meets the lower deck in a sinuous compound curve, which is supported by a complex blocking system.

Figure 9. At one edge, below a built-in bench, horizontal blocking lagged to the joist and reinforced with vertical blocks completes the curve.

Figure 10. The installed fascia guides the router jig to cut the field decking concentric to the curve of the fascia.

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