Safety Glasses Belong in Front of the Eyes

I really enjoy your magazine; the articles and information are very useful. I do have one criticism to make. The photo on the front cover of the January/February 2008 issue (left) shows a carpenter plumbing up a post. I'm thinking the safety glasses on the top of his head may help deflect an errant nail but will do little for his eyesight. It's ironic that one of the articles in the same issue concerns buying health insurance. Keep up the good work.

Mark WasielewskiEast Hartford, Conn.

Bosch Table Saw Correction

In my review of the Bosch 4100DG-09 table saw ( PDB, January/February 2008, page 84), I mistakenly stated that the riving knife needed to be completely removed from the saw for dado operations.

In fact, Bosch has made provisions for the knife to be used with a stan­dard 8-?inch dado head. This is accom­plished by un­lock­ing the knife from one of its normal (upright) posi­tions and drop­ping it into a detent that is cast into the knife's body. Doing so locks the knife lower down so it doesn't inter­fere with material being run through the dado blade.

In addition, I've discovered that Bosch has a tutorial on its Web site ( on the proper installation of the guard system. This video explains the process in a very clear fashion and should be beneficial to those setting up the saw for the first time.

Greg BurnetBerwyn, Ill.

More Practical Topics, Please

I have to say the last couple of issues have been a little disappointing. Build­ing with big timber? Curved benches? I started building decks in 1978 and I can count on one hand the number of curved decks I've built. Never have I used or seen telephone poles for post supports.

Give us ideas we can use every day on the real decks being built out there. How about articles on posts with decorative stone at the bottom? Benches for square decks? I'd like to see more on lighting, pergolas, dry space under decks, built-in kitchens, cost comparisons on different rail systems, under-deck storage units, custom-made lattice, specialty tools, and pricing for all of the above. These are things that we would actually use to make more money.

Kevin HealyVia e-mail

Reshaped Article

Observant readers may have wondered €” when they read "Reshaping the Stair" in the Day's End department in the March/April 2008 issue €” how the remodeled deck at the bottom of the page was any different from the original one.

The reason for the con­fusion is that the photo marked "before" is not a photo of the old deck, as we incorrectly noted, but is actually a photo of the new deck. The correct "before" photo is shown here. The article as it should have appeared can be downloaded as a .pdf file from We regret the error. — The Editors